Archive | February, 2019

Tags: , , , , ,

How to stay focused with your portfolio

Posted on 07 February 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: How to start investing with a tiny budget / Converting inbound inquiries / Average marketing capital needed to sell a domain asset / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

Looking for Fitness Related .COM – Budget: Up to $1,000.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio for a fitness related .com that meets this buyers guideline. They are looking for a smooth transaction.

I Want to Buy a ONE WORD .co Domain – This investor has a budget of up to $200.00 for the right one-word .co ccTLD. Take a look at their specified criteria if you have one you want to liquidate for some fast cash.

TableLights.com sold for $12,000 – That’s not a bad eleven-letter, two-word, .com domain name sales report for five-figures. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

Average marketing capital needed to sell a domain asset – Do you have a marketing budget to promote your domains listed for sale? How much do you spend? Check out what other domain investors are spending on advertising their domains before one sells.

Converting inbound inquiries – Do you have a set strategy that works on converting potential buyers that contacted you first? Compare notes with other domain investors that have been finding success.

How to start investing with a tiny budget – Are you strapped for cash, but wanting to get started in domain investing on a tight budget? Take a peek at what other domain investors are suggesting.

How to stay focused with your portfolio – Do you have a hard time focusing on your domain name portfolio? Is it organized and niche specific? How is it converting? Take a look at what other domain investors are doing to stay more focused on their domain portfolio so it doesn’t get out of hand.

Comments (1)

At Which Point Do You CHANGE Your Strategy?

Posted on 07 February 2019 by Andrei

This is perhaps one of the trickiest questions in domaining, an industry where “hopium” tends to abound, along with many mistakes such as the ones I’ve mentioned earlier this week.

The word “potential” is very dangerous in my opinion, because you can use it as an argument in favor of a losing strategy indefinitely. Let’s assume you’ve hand registered 2,000 domains based on a certain strategy. Maybe geo domains, perhaps something else, we’ll just call it StrategyA.

At which point is it time to pull the plug on StrategyA?

Well, maybe the first renewal cycle. Unfortunately, you’ll have to pay let’s say $18,000 per year to keep your domains, which essentially means you’ll need to generate $18k in sales just to break even. Ouch!

If your renewal season calculations are disastrous, such as for example generating only $2,000 in sales (which are not nearly enough to offset your $18,000 renewal bill), it would probably be wise to consider dropping the entire strategy, eating your $16k or whatever loss and moving on.

Unfortunately, the word “potential” creeps up on you and whispers in your ear that if you only wait another year, it’s all going to be just so wonderful. Plus, you’ve already invested money in these domains, so why let that go to waste?

This idea that you’ve already invested money and it would be a shame to pull the plug is actually a logical error, commonly referred to as the sunk cost fallacy (I’ve linked to a one minute video about it over on my One Minute Economics YouTube channel) or, as they say, throwing good money after bad.

Don’t do it… just don’t!

If the numbers make sense after the first renewal cycle, good for you, keep up the good work.

If they don’t, ask yourself:

  1. How close to break even you were, because sure, if you’re only down let’s say $1k or so, the risk/reward ratio associated with giving it a go for a while longer makes sense
  2. If you were not close to breaking even, what kind of a reason do you have to keep going… do you for example know someone who has tried a similar strategy, had a very bad first year and then recovered? Ask yourself if you at least have SOME rational reason behind your decision

… whatever you do, don’t just play the “well, it has potential” card because that’s unfortunately a surefire way to lose the farm 🙁

Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose… it’s just as true for domaining as it is when it comes to pretty much any industry. Those who do well in the long run are definitely not people who never lose, who don’t screw up. Not at all, everyone makes mistakes.

A wise domainer, however, knows how to pull the plug. Please remember that good money management can be just as important as having solid domain selection skills, being good in the sales department (negotiation expertise, hustle, etc.) and so on!

Comments Off on At Which Point Do You CHANGE Your Strategy?

Tags: , , , , , ,

Increasing domain renewal fees causing large portfolio holders to sell

Posted on 05 February 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: Defining a domain names value / 97688.com sold for $4,597 / Should you turn domain privacy off? / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today:

Buying pronounceable LLLL.COM and dictionary words .co.uk domains – This buyer has a total budget of up to $20,000.00 and looking for four-letter .com’s in bulk. Do you have one that fits this buyers criteria?

Buying 2 word .coms with specific keywords and CVCV.com / VCVC.com – If you have any two-word .com’s with specific keywords, CVCV .com’s, or a VCVC .com, you could be up to $5,000.00 richer. Take a look at this buyers guideline.

Byepage.com -What exactly does a “Bye Page” look like? Is that the popup that say’s goodbye before you leave a website, or could it be something else? What would a domain like this one be worth in today’s market?

Should you turn domain privacy off? – There’s a mixed consensus when it comes to domain privacy. Some prefer it on so they get less spam and other prefer it public so they get more domain purchase inquiries. What about you?

97688.com sold for $4,597 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a five-number .com in the mid-four-figure range. Do you think it shpuld have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

Defining a domain names value – Do you have a domain appraising or evaluation strategy that hits the nail on the head? Take a look at how other domain investors determine value in a domain and share your strategy too.

Increasing domain renewal fees causing large portfolio holders sellHas anyone else started to see some of the larger portfolio holders dropping or selling more domains for a fraction of what they used to?

Comments (1)

Tags: ,

5th year anniversary goes off with a whimper. What’s next for new GTLDs

Posted on 05 February 2019 by Graham Haynes

After launching in April 2014, 2years later registrations had shot up to over 20 million. Move on another 3 years to February 2019 and that growth has stalled to zero.

The 5th anniversary was met with no fanfare, no proclamations of .com being resigned to the dustbin, like AM radio, which in hindsight looks silly. We domainers love domains and that love can be miss-placed, I’m sure we have all loved a domain too much only to find we are the only ones to see the beauty in the name. That’s what has happened to the buyers of dot horse, dot blue and dot kiwi they fell in love with them but no one else did.

MMX owners of a portfolio including.VIP the most successful nGTLD launch in my opinion and .horse the most ridiculed, have been in merger/buyout talks for 18 months. That tells me no one is in a huge hurry to invest. So many corporations have not used their dot brand notably Fox TV who made a big issue of the transfer from Fox.com to the URL dot fox but it never happened. Now it’s a sport to spot one in the wild, like spotting a rare bird, something to be noted and recorded.

So what’s next. Slow death by confusion. The single biggest reason for the failure has been the sheer numbers at launch with plurals and variations such as photo, photos, photography, pictures, pics and it just goes on. Foretold by many domainers notably Berkins that the madness of this will cause confusion and the public won’t be bothered to understand it.

TLD .IO extension has been successful, built on by a community which wants to identify themselves as geniuses, cutting edge and new which demonstrates there always were enough naming options and pure domainers have made more money on that one extension than all the nGTLDs.

R

Comments (3)

Happy… Safer Internet Day?

Posted on 05 February 2019 by Andrei

As of 2003, the “Safer Internet Day” is celebrated on the 5th of February each year. If nothing else, it at least gives us a decent enough opportunity to at least think about how secure our experience on the Internet is.

Perhaps it’s time for a “domaining edition” 🙂

In other words, why not spend a minute or so thinking about your current security protocols as a domain investor and what (if anything) could be done to improve them:

  1. First and foremost, PLEASE use Two-Factor Authentication (commonly referred to as 2FA) whenever this option is offered to you. If your registrar offers this option, take advantage of it. If you have this option when logging into your email account (at the very least your most important account or accounts), take advantage of it. Think about it: by adding another layer of security to the “username + password” dimension, you’re making it a lot harder for those with malicious intentions to compromise your account(s). Use whichever 2FA option works best for you: SMS, phone calls, Google Authenticator, the list could go on and on… just do SOMETHING!
  2. Secondly, don’t be an excessively cheap bastard (and this is coming from a proud self-proclaimed cheap bastard!) and at least buy a decent antivirus package… it won’t break the bank and while by no means a guarantee, it’s at least better than nothing
  3. Understand that not even the best antivirus in the world can protect you against yourself… more specifically, against your dangerous browsing habits. If you think watching certain types of movies (wink-wink) on your work laptop is A-OK just because you’ve purchased antivirus software, think again. In my opinion, common sense is far, far more effective than software when it comes to protecting you
  4. Whenever you’re typing in sensitive data, develop the habit of checking the URL bar and making sure you’re on the right website. This is especially important if we’re talking about websites related to let’s say crypto or another industry where phishing threats are more widely spread
  5. Don’t let other people use your computer unless you absolutely have to… you can be the most prudent Internet user out there but if you let your buddy use your laptop to watch movies online on shady websites…. yeah, bad idea!
  6. Be careful and picky when it comes to Wi-Fi networks. Personally, I’ve never used the Wi-Fi network of let’s say a public restaurant or anything along those lines. You can tether your phone, use a mobile modem or figure something else out, use your imagination

… I’ll end this list here, but feel free to add to it.

In my opinion, people in general and domainers in particular don’t exactly have the habit of thinking about online security all that much, at least not until they have a darn “good” reason to, like a security breach, virus infection, ransomware situation and so on.

Don’t take Internet security for granted, just don’t!

Comments Off on Happy… Safer Internet Day?

DOMAINER Turnover Rates?

Posted on 04 February 2019 by Andrei

Despite being a *very* small industry, the turnover rate in the domaining business is nothing short of impressive.

Yet another confirmation of the “history might not repeat itself, but it sure does rhyme!” adage.

Think of it as multiple fad cycles, with new investors who smell money coming on board, reading a bit and thinking they now have it all figured out… after all, they just read three articles about domaining on the Internet, time to invest! 🙂

They then proceed to make the same mistakes many of us (myself included) make. Continue Reading

Comments (3)

Tags: , , , , ,

Outbound – First impression – Fake Name vs. Real Name

Posted on 03 February 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: Football related domain name discussion / OrganicBouquet.com sold for $4,688 / How to find all taken TLDs for a domain name / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today:

Buying a Brand Name for Secure Video Viewing – Budget: Up to $10,000.00 – Do you have any secure video viewing related brandable domains in your portfolio you would sell for that much? Check out their guideline.

Offer Domain Needed – Budget: Up to $500.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio for a “Offer” related domain you want to liquidate for some fast cash. Taske a look at this buyers specified criteria.

Track domain inventory – Is using a spreadsheet a thing of the past for tracking domain name inventory you own or are you still doing it? Take a peek at what other domain investors are doing to track their domain inventory.

How to find all taken TLDs for a domain name – Are you researching domains and basing value on how many other extensions are registered too? Share some of your research and compare notes with other like minded investors.

Football related domain name discussion – Are you a big football fan? Are you investing into football related domains or thinking about it? Take a look at what other domain investors are saying about it.

OrganicBouquet.com sold for $4,688 – That’s not a bad mid-four-figure domain name sales report for a fourteen-letter, two-word, bouquet related .com domain. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

Outbound – First impression – Fake Name vs. Real Name – Have you ever used a fake name to protect your identity when sending outbound emails, in fear the recipient might report you for spam? Does using a fake name hurt your credibility when you find an interested party? Check out what other domain investors are saying.

Comments Off on Outbound – First impression – Fake Name vs. Real Name

The share owners of the listed company MMX are starting to eat .horse

Posted on 03 February 2019 by Graham Haynes

MMX is the owner of .vip .work .horse amongst others including .xxx which they recently acquired from ICM. It’s getting messy at MMX (Minds and Machines) as their share price drops nearly 70% from a high of 15p.  Arguments between the bulls and bears on their share chat board is getting nasty.

http://www.lse.co.uk/ShareChat.asp?ShareTicker=MMX&share=minds+mach

What is clear, they know the machination of investing in public listed companies but have very little knowledge of domains.

None of the private shareholders can understand the fall given they are posting profits and growth. From a domainers point of view, it is abundantly clear MMX are window dressing the figures to be brought out and the underlying picture is ugly. Take dot work, not any of the investors realise they are being sold at the lowest price for a domain in the universe right now at LESS than one cent and the growth in numbers they extol can all be explained away by this. MMX is not coming clean with investors that this is their strategy, and they believe they are getting $5 – $8 a name.

It is shocking their lack of knowledge of costings. The ICANN fees of $0.25 per registration and Nominet registry fees of at least $4. Given that XYZ experienced over 90% drop rate after the giveaway period, they will never be able to recover the sunken costs of the giveaway period, in the following years at $10 -20 renewal.

1 Japanese yen 0.009 dollars

The other blind spot they all have is the broader performance of new GTLDs, they still believe its a young, nascent industry and they are waiting for greater public awareness. Instead, with a little digging, it is evident that least 80% of registrations are domain speculators, especially Chinese and they are haemorrhaging money. The public has rejected them on the whole. It’s a precarious business with little upside and a lot of risks. I’m expecting the share price to drop further as domainers abandon ship for the legacy domains. Even Uniregistry the champions of nGTLDs in their State of the Industry 2019 commented ‘.com will continue to rule supreme’.

They need to be aware the SP is a reflection of the fact if you stripped out names sold for less than a cent their overall portfolio is shrinking in numbers and furthermore the market is in steady decline and still got a way to go. Maybe the SP is a little high at 5p.

For transparency, I don’t own shares in MMX and never have worked or involved in any business with them, all opinions are my own, do your own research.

Comments (8)

Tags: , , , , ,

T15.com Potentially Stolen

Posted on 01 February 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: Using Quora for promoting domain names / How2Ssl.com sold for $5,000 / CVCV – LLLL.com wanted – Budget: Up to $1,500.00 / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today:

Catchy Domain Needed FOR E-COMMERCE SITE !! – Budget: Up to $500.00 – If you have a catchy eCommerce related domain name in your portfolio that meets this buyers specified criteria, you could be up to $500.00 richer.

Adhd( attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ) related domain wanted – This buyer has a budget of up to $600.00 if you have a attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHA) related domain name that they like. Check it out.

Wanted: “domain” domains – Budget: Up to $50.00 – Do you have any domain names starting with the word “Domain” or ending with the word “Domains” that you want to liquidate for some fast cash?

CVCV – LLLL.com wanted – Budget: Up to $1,500.00 – Be sure to triple check your portfolio for one of these CVCV four-letter .com domain name assets. This buyer is ready for a quick and easy deal.

Using Quora for promoting domain names – Has anyone ever tried using Quora for promoting their domain names for sale? if so, how did you do it and still be in compliance with their terms of use? Check out what other domain investors are saying.

How2Ssl.com sold for $5,000 – Wait, what? I would have never guessed that this domain would have sold for that. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

T15.com Potentially Stolen – Does anyone else have some more information n this domain name? Could it be stolen or is it a false alarm? What do you think?

Comments (2)

How Much Is Your Time Worth?

Posted on 01 February 2019 by Andrei

Generating a decent ROI is not enough, you need to also factor in how time-consuming domaining is for you.

This obviously varies a lot from person to person. Some people just own great domains, sit back and relax. They reply to an offer here and there, renew their domains, finalize sales via escrow or other methods and that’s it. Others have a more hands-on approach and list on lots of platforms, auction domains through various venues, do end user outreach and the list could go on and on.

Continue Reading

Comments (2)