The Internet Has Changed… and Is Changing!

Posted on 26 March 2019

I found myself spending a bit of time on TikTok today, an app primarily used by kids, tweens and so on… basically a platform through which people publish short funny videos and stuff like that.

Something struck me like lightning: it’s just ridiculous how much traffic this one app that I didn’t even know existed had. You see kids who become instant-celebrities in the blink of an eye. Random quirky funny vids that get millions of “hearts” and the list could go on and on.

I firmly believe that at least once a month or so, domainers should download the hottest app(s) and see just what’s working online these days… in my opinion, it will be an eye-opening experience.

Now don’t get me wrong, there have been “Internet sensations” and “wiz kid” case studies let’s say ten years ago as well… but nowadays, more and more, it’s becoming straightforward. Almost institutionalized, really. One platform after another is giving people the change to tap into a humongous user base and create a career just like that.

Now, of course, as Rick Schwartz points out… if you live by social media, you might just die by social media. And he’s spot on in that there are also very sad case studies involving flavor of the month online celebrities that died along with their platform… remember Vine? Yeah… ๐Ÿ™

Therefore, this entire equation00 needs to be taken with a grain of salt and I do believe that among other things, this experiment that I’m suggesting (should you choose to try it) will illustrate that domains aren’t going anywhere and that there’s an Internet freedom-defining role that comes with them. While TikTok or any other social media app can ban you just like that with little to no recourse, domains are a lot harder to ban/take down. Not impossible, just a lot harder.

On the other hand though, unlike domains where the burden of carving your own little niche lies exclusively on you, social media sites do enable you to tap into a ridiculously large audience pool just like that and take advantage of the *existing* eyeballs each platform has.

At the end of the day, I believe your conclusion will coincide with mine: that domains and social media can complement one another nicely but that if you aren’t doing your very best to understand the social media phenomenon in a truly meaningful manner… you’re doing your career as a domainer a disservice!

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The day I started domaining – Success in developing domains

Posted on 25 March 2019

Today: LVBO.com sold for $10,249 / Tips learned by myself and a veteran domain investor / Buying Brandable & Pronouncable 4L.coms – Budget: Up to $3,000.00 / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

Wanted! Two word .com – Budget: Up to $2,000.00 – Make sure that you are not holding one of these two-word .com domain name assets. This buyer is ready to invest if you have the right one.

Looking for domains that gets TONS OF TRAFFIC!!! – Budget: Up to $500.00 – Be sure to check your domain portfolio for any traffic generating domains that are not converting for you good enough. This buyer will take them off your hands if they meet their guideline.

Buying SquadHelp Listed Domains – Budget: Up to $50.00 each – Do you have any HelpSquad listed domain names that you would sell for up to $50.00 a pop? If so, check out this buyers specified criteria.

Buying Brandable & Pronouncable 4L.coms – Budget: Up to $3,000.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio for a pronounceable or brandable four-letter .com. This buyer is ready for a smooth transaction if you have the one they need.

Tips learned by myself and a veteran domain investorย – What have you learned the hard way through trial and error versus what a seasoned investor taught you? Take a look at this investors story.

LVBO.com sold for $10,249 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a random four-letter .com domain for five-figures. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

The day I started domaining – Success in developing domainsย – Have you ever thought about developing a domain name asset to build more value? If you want to hear a great story about a 6 year investor that made the choice to develop a few, here you go.

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Domains Are More “Portable” Than Precious Metals!

Posted on 24 March 2019

… just let that sink in for a moment because it’s an argument in favor of domains that you usually don’t hear all that frequently.

Let’s assume you live in Country X and things are going well enough: you own your home (zero debt), have a decent car, local stocks valued at around $25,000, precious metals worth $10,000 and a LLL.com.

When it comes to your LLL.com, you’re kind of sad that in 2019, it’s no longer worth as much as it was in let’s say January of 2016… but that’s life, the situation is what it is.

You keep doing your thing, when all of a sudden, massive protest movements start and a revolution is shaping up, a revolution let’s say against private property… needless to say, you’re not exactly well-positioned over there and, fearing that your family might be in danger, decide to leave.

Let’s take a look at your wealth and study the implications of that decision:

A) you have to leave your home behind, your most prized possession, so that probably goes to $0

B) will you be allowed to take your car with you? Maybe… but probably not, it will most likely get confiscated at the border by the revolutionaries… $0

C) your local stocks? Well, I guess you might find someone who buys them for you at pennies on the dollar… although I’m not sure who would want to be holding them at this point in time… let’s assume you manage to sell them but only obtain $2,500 for them, not amazing when you think about how, not that long ago, they were valued at $25,000. Oh and btw, even those $2,500 might get confiscated at the border, no money for you, $0

D) your precious metals? Well, once again, the likelihood of them being confiscated at the border is sky-high, so… yeah, $0

… which leaves, you’ve guessed it, your LLL.com ๐Ÿ™‚

Fortunately for you, you remember your GoDaddy login details as well as your email login info. As such, you can leave the country and “take” your domain with you without having anything physical on your person.

Therefore, ironically, that LLL.com might be the only thing you have left to build a new life when all is said and done… in this specific scenario, of course. You travel to another country, sell it and the money you obtain should be enough to get you and your family a shot at a fresh start.

There are of course also scenarios in which domain values can go to $0 or almost $0… the bottom line however is that when it comes to situations such as the one I’ve just referred to, it becomes clear that one of the top selling points of domains is represented by their extreme portability.

I know, there are a lot more: brandability, end user potential, you possibly building a great business on an “instant credibility” domain and so on. Just wanted to bring a less popular selling point to your attention today and hopefully make some wheels spin ๐Ÿ™‚

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How to invest $10k in the domain industry

Posted on 23 March 2019

Today: Indian Brands using Generic Phrases – Domains – .IN and .CO.IN / Altamira.com sold for $5,751 / The appraisal of JobBanks.org / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

SolarJacuzzi.com – What do you think about a solar Jacuzzi? Would you ever use one? It sounds like an interesting invention. What do you think the .com is worth?

Buying 4 letter .com only – Budget: Up to $150.00 – If you are looking to liquidate a four-letter .com for some fast cash, this might be an opportunity. Check out this buyers specified criteria.

Buying NNN.tv – Budget: $50-$100 – Do you have any three-number .tv ccTLD’s in your portfolio you would sell for a quick wholesale price? If so, check out this buyers guideline.

The appraisal of JobBanks.org – A job bank non-profit seems like a good fit. Do you think it fits enough to have value in today’s market though? What would you appraise it for?

Indian Brands using Generic Phrases – Domains – .IN and .CO.IN – Is anyone else following this new generic brand trend going on in India with .in and .co.in domain names? Check it out.

Altamira.com sold for $5,751 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a eight-letter brandable .com domain for a mid-four-figures. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

How to invest $10k in the domain industry – If you had $10,000.00 to invest into the domain name industry, how would you go about investing it? Take a look at what other domain investors are suggesting to put the money.

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The “Death” of an Industry

Posted on 22 March 2019

“Is domaining dead?” is probably one of the top 10 discussion topics among domainers of any given week. As someone who has been involved in a few other industries as well, I can say this phenomenon is not just limited to our tiny little corner of the Internet.

Why?

Well, because it’s one of things that’s true but actually isn’t ๐Ÿ™‚

Let me explain.

In my opinion, the debate has very solid roots, in that many business models have indeed been disrupted, there have been many disappointments, a lot of people who have done very well up until a certain point ended up on a downward path, legislative dangers lurk behind every corner, etc.

However:

A) this is natural

B) it happens to any industry out there

… it’s called MATURITY. Nothing more, nothing less.

More specifically, of course there’s less and less low-hanging fruit as time passes and of course that blessed with the “wisdom” of hindsight, we’d love to travel back to the good old days (for what it’s worth, we frequently tend to idealize and in a lot of cases, the good old days were actually not as amazing as our memory tells us they were). But just because the good old days exist, does this mean the industry in question is dead in the present?

Of course not.

It does however mean that if you play by yesterday’s rules, the market will eat you alive. In any industry out there, you cannot survive if you don’t adapt and not everyone manages to do that. Perhaps because as of a certain point, it just gets too hard, perhaps because some old-timers have become so financially secure that they lost the “hunger” to go the extra mile and be cutting edge… there are multiple explanations as to why people can be doing worse today than in the past.

But a mature industry isn’t dead by any means, it’s just different.

At the end of the day, there are so many ways to skin a cat online that it’s not even funny. It’s ultimately on you to take a look at your domaining career and decide what you can do next.

Perhaps at this point in time, there are options which give you more bang for your buck and it would be better to stop being a domainer. No problem at all, it’s all up to you. Many domainers have gone down all sorts of different paths. Some quit altogether, some adopted a more passive strategy so as to direct time/resources elsewhere… the sky is the limit when it comes to possibilities.

Also, it’s not like a decision you make today has to be set in stone… not at all. If market conditions change, you can return. If not, you won’t. I guess the only thing I’m trying to say is that domainers would have a lot to gain by adopting a mentality that revolves around abundance, around being grateful that there are gazillions of amazing opportunities to make stuff happen on the Internet.

Domaining may not be as “hot” as it once was, c’est la vie, but it doesn’t mean it’s going anywhere ๐Ÿ˜‰

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Best strategy to snap up a good two word .com domain

Posted on 21 March 2019

Today: Will the emoji domain ever take off? / Optim.com sold for $20,420 / The preferred method to verify domain ownership / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

.Co domain wanted, only one word – Budget: Up to $1,000.00 – Do you have any single-word .co ccTLD’s in your portfolio that meet this buyers specified criteria? If so, you could be up to four-figures richer.

Buying Travel Related Domain names – Budget: Up to $200.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio for a travel related domain name like the one this buyer is looking for. If you’re looking for some quick wholesale cash, this could be an opportunity.

$6.99 .NET Flash Sale from Dynadot – If you were thinking about registering any .net domain name assets you think will have more value in the future, check out this promotion for a $5.99 .net.

The preferred method to verify domain ownership – What method do you use to verify if a seller is the actual owner of a domain name asset you want to buy? Have you used any of the methods these investors have mentioned so far?

Will the emoji domain ever take off? – Have you invested in any emoji IDN’s (Internationalized Domain Name’s)? What kind of research do you have showing that they have potential in the long hold game? When will they take off? Take a peek at what some emoji investors are saying about it.

Optim.com sold for $20,420 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a five-letter, pronounceable, brandable, .com domain. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

Best strategy to snap up a good two word .com domain – What strategy are you using right now that effectively identifies and snaps up the perfect two-word .com? Take a look at what some domain investors are saying about it.

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Could Verisign Destroy Your Business Model?

Posted on 20 March 2019

I think it’s a good thing that the recent developments when it comes to dot info and dot org (the possibility that price ceilings might be removed and, as such, we venture into “everything goes” territory… in other words, just like with new gTLDs, huge price increases might become the norm for legacy TLDs as well) have caused great concern in the domaining world.

Why?

Well, because even if you don’t have skin in the game when it comes to .info/.org at this point (for what it’s worth, I don’t), you do need to understand the possible implications when it comes to the elephant in the room: dot com.

The landscape has changed for domainers… and not in a good way.

I’ve already mentioned Verisign’s attitude shift when it comes to domainers, the fact that the industry is losing various important allies from a lobbying perspective and what not… there’s little point in beating that dead horse further.

The bottom line is this: the world in 2019 and beyond is shaping up to be less domainer-friendly from many perspectives and if we’re serious about becoming more resilient individually and as an industry, we need to realize just how vulnerable we currently are.

Aside from being a domainer, I’m also an economist and entrepreneur, so fellow domainers ask me for my 2 cents when it comes to business-related stuff every now and then. The most common denominator I’ve noticed when others ask me to look at their business or business idea is their over-reliance on a third party.

In other words, if a third party can ruin your business model with the stroke of a pen… you’re vulnerable.

The same principle applies to domaining.

Let me ask you two questions:

  1. What if Verisign would be allowed to quadruple dot com prices and decide to do just that… what would your domaining business look like the text day?
  2. What if Verisign would be allowed to implement “premium pricing” structures… or, in other words, perhaps they’d decide those who own LLL.coms need to pay $500 per year from now on. What would that do to your business?

A few years ago, I would have considered such scenarios ludicrous.

I still consider them unlikely… but ludicrous? Not really.

If the current trend when it comes to the attitude of the powers that be when it comes to domainers persists, I just don’t see it ending well. Maybe you won’t pay $500 yearly for your LLL.coms but even if you have to pay $250 or $100… you get the point.

My main concern is that way too many domainers still prefer being blissfully ignorant of threats such as these, which is why the statement at the beginning of this blog post should now make more sense… the statement that I’m happy people got goosebumps when reading the current .info/.org debates.

What can or should you do?

Honestly, I’m not quite ready to articulate a position on this that I stand completely behind. At the very least, I guess tuning into more ICANN debates might be a good starting point, something pretty much nobody likes doing.

Or, more broadly speaking, you could/should start by understanding that these discussions are more than just boring bureaucratic mumbo-jumbo… they’re boring bureaucratic mumbo-jumbo that can ruin entire business models overnight ๐Ÿ™

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How to contact a domain owner with private whois!

Posted on 19 March 2019

Today: Buying a 4 Letter (4L) LLLL Pronounceable .com – Budget: Up to $25,000.00 / HistoricalTextArchive.com sold for $8,349 / A .app domain sold for $30,000 before it’s first renewal / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

Buying STADIA domains – Up to $1,000 – Do you have any stadia related domain names in your portfolio you would sell for up to $1,000.00 in cold hard cash? Take a look at this investors guidelines to see if you have what they want.

Everything Starts with a Domain Name – Wouldn’t you agree that everything online starts with a domain name? Check out what some domain investors are saying about the industry as a whole and share your perspective.

HOT.us – Did you see what I saw in the top domain forum today?

Buying a 4 Letter (4L) LLLL Pronounceable .com – Budget: Up to $25,000.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio again for one of these pronounceable four-letter .com’s outlined in the buyers specified criteria.

A .app domain sold for $30,000 before it’s first renewal – That’s not too bad. Did you anticipate that .app sales in the five-digits would take longer or should they have been selling sooner for that much?

HistoricalTextArchive.com sold for $8,349 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a twenty-two-letter, three-word, .com domain for a high four-figures.

How to contact a domain owner with private whois! – When you run into privacy on a domain names whois, how do you find out who the owner of the domain name is? Take a look at what some domain investors are doing to track down a domain owner.

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You’re Only Human… Who Would’ve Thought?

Posted on 18 March 2019

The past two weeks have been a pretty humbling experience, since my body repeatedly showed me its limitations… something I’m not used to AT ALL!

It started with a tolerable but annoying knee injury, which left me unable to do a bunch of tasks which always came easy to me. What followed was a period of stomach pain, and, finally, the flu which has been making my life miserable for the past 48 hours (chills, continuous fever, the whole enchilada).

Come to think of it, I guess I should be in bed instead of writing this, heh.

But before my wife notices that I’m working and forces me to do just that, I felt this is an important post to write because we make contingency plans for a lot of business-related scenarios… market downturns or even crashes, industry-specific turbulences and what have you.

What many of us fail to do, however, is make plans that pertain to our health or, more specifically, what happens when it deteriorates ๐Ÿ™

Now, sure, we all *know* our health can and eventually will deteriorate.

But how many of us truly internalize this threat?

The thing is, I don’t usually get sick and when I do eventually come down with something, it tends to manifest itself as an annoying headache that an hour of sleep makes go away.

It’s not until you get an occasional wake-up call from your body that you realize just how much you actually do each day, just how much you take for granted and just how difficult things get when that’s taken away from you.

The bottom line is this: to call yourself a robust/resilient domainer (or entrepreneur, investor, freelancer, whatever it is you do for a living), you need contingency plans in place for when things go sour health-wise.

To give you an example that pertains to my YouTube channel, I try to have at least a month’s worth of videos as a buffer and the same principle applies to the other stuff I do. Needless to say, I’m very grateful for that buffer right about now, when I mostly feel that my head is about to explode.

And on that note, it’s time for another cup of tea and a bit more rest!

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Falling in love with domains again

Posted on 17 March 2019

Today: Negotiation tricks for high ticket domain sales / HealthChoicesPa.com sold for $5,505 / Why Dot-Best new tld may in fact be one of the “best” / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

Two word exact match .com – Budget: Up to $1,000.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio for one of these two-word exact match .com domain names. This buyer is ready for a quick wholesale transaction.

The percentage of assumed end user price a domain investor should pay to acquire a domain – Is there even a fixed percentage for that? Wouldn’t it all depend on multiple variables? How do you determine the reseller price based on the end-user price?

Why 6N.com w/ repeated pattern are worth more when the pattern is at the end and not the beginning – Do you know the answer to this domain evaluation question? Why do you think that there is a difference in value? Take a peek at what some domain investors are saying about it.

HealthChoicesPa.com sold for $5,505ย – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a fifteen-letter, two-word + one abbreviation, .com domain for a mid-four-figures. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

Negotiation tricks for high ticket domain sales – Do you have some super special negotiation tricks or strategies to help close a big ticket domain name sale? Take a look at what other domain investors do to close a deal and share your experience, too.

Why Dot-Best new tld may in fact be one of the “best” – Wait, did they just say the new .best gTLD might be one of or the best TLD’s? Does someone have any stats to compare to verify or debunk that?

Falling in love with domains again – Have you ever fallen out of love with domain names? Maybe you decided to take a break for a while. It may be time to step back into the game. More and more investors of one time past are coming back to play too.

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