Archive | March, 2019

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Best strategy to snap up a good two word .com domain

Posted on 21 March 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: Will the emoji domain ever take off? / Optim.com sold for $20,420 / The preferred method to verify domain ownership / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

.Co domain wanted, only one word – Budget: Up to $1,000.00 – Do you have any single-word .co ccTLD’s in your portfolio that meet this buyers specified criteria? If so, you could be up to four-figures richer.

Buying Travel Related Domain names – Budget: Up to $200.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio for a travel related domain name like the one this buyer is looking for. If you’re looking for some quick wholesale cash, this could be an opportunity.

$6.99 .NET Flash Sale from Dynadot – If you were thinking about registering any .net domain name assets you think will have more value in the future, check out this promotion for a $5.99 .net.

The preferred method to verify domain ownership – What method do you use to verify if a seller is the actual owner of a domain name asset you want to buy? Have you used any of the methods these investors have mentioned so far?

Will the emoji domain ever take off? – Have you invested in any emoji IDN’s (Internationalized Domain Name’s)? What kind of research do you have showing that they have potential in the long hold game? When will they take off? Take a peek at what some emoji investors are saying about it.

Optim.com sold for $20,420 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a five-letter, pronounceable, brandable, .com domain. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

Best strategy to snap up a good two word .com domain – What strategy are you using right now that effectively identifies and snaps up the perfect two-word .com? Take a look at what some domain investors are saying about it.

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Could Verisign Destroy Your Business Model?

Posted on 20 March 2019 by Andrei

I think it’s a good thing that the recent developments when it comes to dot info and dot org (the possibility that price ceilings might be removed and, as such, we venture into “everything goes” territory… in other words, just like with new gTLDs, huge price increases might become the norm for legacy TLDs as well) have caused great concern in the domaining world.

Why?

Well, because even if you don’t have skin in the game when it comes to .info/.org at this point (for what it’s worth, I don’t), you do need to understand the possible implications when it comes to the elephant in the room: dot com.

The landscape has changed for domainers… and not in a good way.

I’ve already mentioned Verisign’s attitude shift when it comes to domainers, the fact that the industry is losing various important allies from a lobbying perspective and what not… there’s little point in beating that dead horse further.

The bottom line is this: the world in 2019 and beyond is shaping up to be less domainer-friendly from many perspectives and if we’re serious about becoming more resilient individually and as an industry, we need to realize just how vulnerable we currently are.

Aside from being a domainer, I’m also an economist and entrepreneur, so fellow domainers ask me for my 2 cents when it comes to business-related stuff every now and then. The most common denominator I’ve noticed when others ask me to look at their business or business idea is their over-reliance on a third party.

In other words, if a third party can ruin your business model with the stroke of a pen… you’re vulnerable.

The same principle applies to domaining.

Let me ask you two questions:

  1. What if Verisign would be allowed to quadruple dot com prices and decide to do just that… what would your domaining business look like the text day?
  2. What if Verisign would be allowed to implement “premium pricing” structures… or, in other words, perhaps they’d decide those who own LLL.coms need to pay $500 per year from now on. What would that do to your business?

A few years ago, I would have considered such scenarios ludicrous.

I still consider them unlikely… but ludicrous? Not really.

If the current trend when it comes to the attitude of the powers that be when it comes to domainers persists, I just don’t see it ending well. Maybe you won’t pay $500 yearly for your LLL.coms but even if you have to pay $250 or $100… you get the point.

My main concern is that way too many domainers still prefer being blissfully ignorant of threats such as these, which is why the statement at the beginning of this blog post should now make more sense… the statement that I’m happy people got goosebumps when reading the current .info/.org debates.

What can or should you do?

Honestly, I’m not quite ready to articulate a position on this that I stand completely behind. At the very least, I guess tuning into more ICANN debates might be a good starting point, something pretty much nobody likes doing.

Or, more broadly speaking, you could/should start by understanding that these discussions are more than just boring bureaucratic mumbo-jumbo… they’re boring bureaucratic mumbo-jumbo that can ruin entire business models overnight 🙁

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How to contact a domain owner with private whois!

Posted on 19 March 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: Buying a 4 Letter (4L) LLLL Pronounceable .com – Budget: Up to $25,000.00 / HistoricalTextArchive.com sold for $8,349 / A .app domain sold for $30,000 before it’s first renewal / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

Buying STADIA domains – Up to $1,000 – Do you have any stadia related domain names in your portfolio you would sell for up to $1,000.00 in cold hard cash? Take a look at this investors guidelines to see if you have what they want.

Everything Starts with a Domain Name – Wouldn’t you agree that everything online starts with a domain name? Check out what some domain investors are saying about the industry as a whole and share your perspective.

HOT.us – Did you see what I saw in the top domain forum today?

Buying a 4 Letter (4L) LLLL Pronounceable .com – Budget: Up to $25,000.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio again for one of these pronounceable four-letter .com’s outlined in the buyers specified criteria.

A .app domain sold for $30,000 before it’s first renewal – That’s not too bad. Did you anticipate that .app sales in the five-digits would take longer or should they have been selling sooner for that much?

HistoricalTextArchive.com sold for $8,349 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a twenty-two-letter, three-word, .com domain for a high four-figures.

How to contact a domain owner with private whois! – When you run into privacy on a domain names whois, how do you find out who the owner of the domain name is? Take a look at what some domain investors are doing to track down a domain owner.

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You’re Only Human… Who Would’ve Thought?

Posted on 18 March 2019 by Andrei

The past two weeks have been a pretty humbling experience, since my body repeatedly showed me its limitations… something I’m not used to AT ALL!

It started with a tolerable but annoying knee injury, which left me unable to do a bunch of tasks which always came easy to me. What followed was a period of stomach pain, and, finally, the flu which has been making my life miserable for the past 48 hours (chills, continuous fever, the whole enchilada).

Come to think of it, I guess I should be in bed instead of writing this, heh.

But before my wife notices that I’m working and forces me to do just that, I felt this is an important post to write because we make contingency plans for a lot of business-related scenarios… market downturns or even crashes, industry-specific turbulences and what have you.

What many of us fail to do, however, is make plans that pertain to our health or, more specifically, what happens when it deteriorates 🙁

Now, sure, we all *know* our health can and eventually will deteriorate.

But how many of us truly internalize this threat?

The thing is, I don’t usually get sick and when I do eventually come down with something, it tends to manifest itself as an annoying headache that an hour of sleep makes go away.

It’s not until you get an occasional wake-up call from your body that you realize just how much you actually do each day, just how much you take for granted and just how difficult things get when that’s taken away from you.

The bottom line is this: to call yourself a robust/resilient domainer (or entrepreneur, investor, freelancer, whatever it is you do for a living), you need contingency plans in place for when things go sour health-wise.

To give you an example that pertains to my YouTube channel, I try to have at least a month’s worth of videos as a buffer and the same principle applies to the other stuff I do. Needless to say, I’m very grateful for that buffer right about now, when I mostly feel that my head is about to explode.

And on that note, it’s time for another cup of tea and a bit more rest!

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Falling in love with domains again

Posted on 17 March 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: Negotiation tricks for high ticket domain sales / HealthChoicesPa.com sold for $5,505 / Why Dot-Best new tld may in fact be one of the “best” / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

Two word exact match .com – Budget: Up to $1,000.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio for one of these two-word exact match .com domain names. This buyer is ready for a quick wholesale transaction.

The percentage of assumed end user price a domain investor should pay to acquire a domain – Is there even a fixed percentage for that? Wouldn’t it all depend on multiple variables? How do you determine the reseller price based on the end-user price?

Why 6N.com w/ repeated pattern are worth more when the pattern is at the end and not the beginning – Do you know the answer to this domain evaluation question? Why do you think that there is a difference in value? Take a peek at what some domain investors are saying about it.

HealthChoicesPa.com sold for $5,505 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a fifteen-letter, two-word + one abbreviation, .com domain for a mid-four-figures. Do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

Negotiation tricks for high ticket domain sales – Do you have some super special negotiation tricks or strategies to help close a big ticket domain name sale? Take a look at what other domain investors do to close a deal and share your experience, too.

Why Dot-Best new tld may in fact be one of the “best” – Wait, did they just say the new .best gTLD might be one of or the best TLD’s? Does someone have any stats to compare to verify or debunk that?

Falling in love with domains again – Have you ever fallen out of love with domain names? Maybe you decided to take a break for a while. It may be time to step back into the game. More and more investors of one time past are coming back to play too.

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Domaining and… Counterparty Risk?

Posted on 16 March 2019 by Andrei

If you didn’t get a chance to read about the Alpnames (registrar) drama, click here, here and here.

The bottom line (and broader lesson to be learned) is this: as a domainer, you’re making a huge mistake by assuming the only risks you have to deal with are market-based ones such as domains in general going down in value, domains that pertain to your industry/industries of interest going down in value and so on.

Unfortunately, that’s not the case.

There are also counterparty risks you need to be aware of and if you’ve never heard about this term before, here’s a one minute video about counterparty risk that I think you’ll find useful. It’s a term you’ll be coming across quite a bit throughout your existence, so I believe it would be wise to internalize what it is all about.

In a nutshell, you need to understand that when doing business, there’s always the risk that those you do business with will let you down, scam you, go bankrupt and so on. As such, prudence is the operative word when deciding which companies you work with.

The Alpnames situation is a textbook example of the fact that no, domain registration services should not be treated as commodities (check out this video about commodities/commoditization if you want to better understand the term or don’t already know what it’s all about)… or, in other words, that it’s not a good idea to simply go with the company that puts the lowest price on the table and assume that bam, that problem has been solved and you can sleep well at night.

The same way, it means you need to be professional and proactive when it comes to portfolio consolidation, so anything from moving domains away from questionable registrars you only went with to save a buck to being less lazy and transferring domains won at expiration auctions to better-known registrars asap and so on.

Yes, it involves a bit of work.

However, it’s a small price to pay when you think about how much it lowers your counterparty risk.

Am I saying you should never take advantage of domain registration/transfer promotions that are put on the table by lesser known domain registrars?

No.

I’m simply pointing out you need to determine the risk/reward ratio to the best of your ability in each case.

If we’re talking about domains that aren’t very valuable to begin with then sure, saving a buck by taking advantage of such promotions is probably a decent enough options.

If however you were thinking about doing the same thing with the jewels of your crown… well, let’s just say putting 4-5 figure domains and above at risk to save a few dollars might not be the wisest decision in the world. I guess you could do it in a perfect business environment, where you knew for a fact your domains would be 100% safe but in our less than perfect (domain) world… yeah, probably not 🙂

I understand and respect the fact that when it comes to some (primarily quantity-based) business models, promotions and jumping from registrar to registrar make the difference between losing money each year and putting food on the table. I completely get that and risks such as registrar-related ones come with the territory.

By all means, don’t be a scaredy-cat or treat this post as me telling you to hide under your mattress all day from now on but on the other hand, don’t be reckless when it comes to your top assets either!

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The most likely new TLD’s to sell themselves

Posted on 15 March 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: Ai (artificial Intelligence) names selling / The deal with VR .com’s and cannabis.com’s / AdExperts.com sold for $4,000 / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

Looking to buy a few English 1-word names in .io, .net and .co – Do you have any English 1-word names in .io, .net and .co you would sell for up to $500.00 each? If so, check out this buyers specified criteria.

Buying pronounceable .com’s – Budget: Up to $500.00 – Be sure to check your portfolio for one of these pronounceable .com’s if you need some quick capital. This buyer looks ready to do business.

Pricing Strategy – Higher commission / Higher sales price – Does your pricing strategy work like this or are you using a different strategy that works better? Compare notes with other domain investors.

AdExperts.com sold for $4,000 – That’s not a bad nine-letter, two-word, .com domain name sales report for a mid-four-figures. do you think it should have sold for more or less than what it sold for?

The deal with VR .com’s and cannabis.com’s – Hey, do you know what the deal is with vr and cannabis related .com domain names are? Take a look at what other domain investors think the deal is.

Ai (artificial Intelligence) names selling – Are you investing in AI (Artificial intelligence) related domain name assets? Sold any yet? Check out what other Ai domain investors are saying about the market.

The most likely new TLD’s to sell themselves – How close have you been following the new TLD markets? This discussion is about the top new TLD’s that domain investors think are good investments because they sell themselves, without much effort.

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Are You an Investor or a Consumer at Heart?

Posted on 14 March 2019 by Andrei

… please note that there’s no right or wrong answer here, it’s all a matter of being in touch with who you really are.

Obviously, if you’re an investor at heart or in other words someone who is always more than willing to defer consumption and re-invest, you’ll probably make more money in the long run as a domainer than someone who prefers consuming right away.

But, again, it’s not a right/wrong situation.

Someone making $x per year can be much happier than someone making $5x yearly. And if the $x per year person says that no, from now on he will do whatever it takes to also earn $5x, he or she will only end up more miserable in the process if the goal of earning more isn’t something he or she genuinely wants.

In my case, I knew all along I was a “cheap bastard” or someone who is not into fancy cars, expensive clothes, exotic vacations and what not. It’s not that I hate these things, I don’t crave them. What I do however crave and have always craved is financial security, knowing that I’m on the right track.

Other people I know are consumers by excellence. They purchase better cars on credit, indulge in the latest and greatest consumer goods (from newly-launched phones to home cinemas, you name it), the list could go on and on.

Are they doing the right thing?

Well, it depends.

In my opinion, as long as they don’t go overboard and become compulsive spenders, the answer is most likely yes as long as they’re doing it for the right reasons. As long as they’re doing it because it makes them happy deep down inside. I have no problems with that whatsoever.

If they do it to impress their friends or because it’s what society conditioned them to think they should be doing, then that’s a different story and way too many people make this mistake.

What I’m trying to say here is that the decision to “live your life” is a deeply personal one and it’s all relative. I feel like I’m living my live by knowing that I’m financially resilient (with peace of mind being what I *actually* crave), whereas other people would be miserable without indulging in the best society has to offer.

Again, I’ll probably do better than them in the long run as an investor… but so what?

In both of my books, I’ve referred to research conducted based on data from multiple countries: time and time again, it has been noted that as long as your basic needs are met, future income gains aren’t correlated with directly proportional increases in happiness.

Therein lies the key do figuring out how to live your life IMO.

If your current financial behavior puts your basic needs in jeopardy, something has to be done. If, however, that is not the case and if your current lifestyle is one you find fulfilling, then by all means, do your thing and be happy.

Simple enough, right?

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Strategy – Focusing on a single domain pitch vs. multiple domains to an end-user

Posted on 13 March 2019 by NamePros Daily

Today: The five-year domain investing plan / Top domain sales of all time! / Lich.com sold for $15,750 / And more!

Here are the new discussions that caught my eye in the domain community today!

LLL.Co wanted – Budget: Up to $600.00 – Do you have any three-letter .co ccTLD’s in your portfolio you would sell for up to $600.00? If so, this might be an opportunity.

Looking good keyword with letter “X” .com – Budget: Up to $250.00 – If you have a keyword .com that contains the letter X, be sure to check out this buyers specified criteria.

Looking for one/two Keyword Domains – Budget: Up to $150.00 – Are you looking to liquidate a sing-word or two-word domain name for some fast cash? Take a look at this buyers guideline.

Lich.com sold for $15,750 – That’s not a bad domain name sales report for a four-letter, pronounceable, brandable, .com. I might have guessed it would sell for more. What do you think it should have sold for?

Top domain sales of all time! – Do you already know what the top domain name sales of all time are? Can you guess what they are? Take a look to see if you were right.

The five-year domain investing plan – Do you have a five-year domain investing plan in place? How did you break it down and organize your goals? Take a peak at what other domains have done for their five-year investing plan.

Strategy – Focusing on a single domain pitch vs. multiple domains to an end-user – Which strategy do you use? Is one better than the other? Check out which strategy domain investors are claiming works better than the other one.

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What Domainers Should and Shouldn’t Be Doing Right Now

Posted on 12 March 2019 by Andrei

Right off the bat, I want to make it perfectly clear that what I’m about to write constitutes my personal opinion and nothing more. There are absolutely no guarantees that you’ll be rewarded by doing (or not doing) any of these things… think of this post as just me sharing the way I feel right about now.

Most of you probably know what the business cycle is all about and if not, the like I’ve just provided will help you understand in about one minute. The bottom line is that humans aren’t angels or robots and as such, the economy doesn’t really have the habit of going up in a continuous linear/predictable manner.

Sometimes, things are going good, so we become excessively optimistic.

The excesses we make when overly optimistic bring about market crashes, recessions and all that good stuff.

Once the dust settles, the economy can start going back up… rinse and repeat.

So, here we are in 2019 and if you haven’t realized it by now… it’s been a LOOOOOOOONG time since the last recession in most countries. We’re talking about record-breaking territory here.

As such, perhaps it would be wise to assume the proverbial party will come to an end sooner rather than later and at the very least implement a few mindset changes here and there.

I’ll start with the things I personally believe should be avoided at this point:

A) F**k the Joneses… or in other words, resist the temptation of buying a fancy car to impress your friends or anything along those lines. Now is the time to be humble, if not fearful

B) on that note, don’t go overboard when it comes to personal spending and, instead, at least build a little buffer fund for yourself. If you were thinking about buying a home cinema, don’t. If your phone works just fine and you wanted to upgrade to a better model “just because” then, once again, don’t

C) take a close look at your portfolio, especially at the assets which have had a very good run… while it is true that the market can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent, it might be a good idea to at least take some profits off the table

D) stay away from ultra-speculative domain investments for the time being and, generally speaking, be less exuberant. Don’t get me wrong, go for it if you’re presented with an absolute bargain, just be careful and perhaps a little bit “tighter” than usual

… alright, so what should you be doing?

A) don’t be afraid to hold on to cash… money, dinero, Geld. While cash is a terrible long-term investment due to inflation, you need to understand that should a collapse take place, those with liquidity at their disposal will be able to take advantage of life-altering purchase opportunities, so there are periods when being long cash makes sense 😉

B) become more willing to invest in assets through which one can “hedge” against uncertainty… in other words, assets that tend to perform well during an economic downturn, I believe the risk/reward ratio associated with being a little bit of a contrarian at this point can work in your favor

C) be more willing to say yes to offers on your domains… this doesn’t mean selling your best assets for pennies on the dollar, not by a long shot, but it does mean it might be a good time to be a bit less rigid than usual

D) there’s no time like the present to restructure a bulky domain portfolio. From bulk sales to simply dropping names, do whatever you can to eliminate liabilities

… I’ll put an end to this post here because I think you understood the message I tried to get across.

Can I guarantee the mother of all market crashes is coming?

No, I cannot.

I’m simply explaining why I believe that at this point in time, it might be wise to consider this possibility more than you have in the past.

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